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Solar Powered Gable-Mounted Attic Vent

Solar Power Eco Friendly Product

The Gable-Mount Solar Vent is an exciting alternative to traditional attic ventilation. That's because it is powered by a solar panel that collects energy directly from the sun and converts it into electricity -- naturally -- to power a durable, high efficiency 24-volt DC motor. As a totally solar-powered solution, it's also environmentally friendly.

There’s no electrical hookup or electrical costs ever. It’s easy to install and easy on your wallet! And that means environmentally friendly, budget conscious operation for year-round comfort.

Qualifies for 2009 Energy Tax CreditPainless Installation
The best installation feature is that the fan requires no electrical hook-up. That means no electrician and no complicated wiring is required, making the installation of your attic fan fast and easy.

It mounts in the gable end of the home, behind a decorative shutter (not provided, see below). The solar panel comes with brackets that allow for mounting on the roof.

After the fan and the solar panel are positioned and secured, a simple plug-in from the fan to the solar panel is all that is required.

Smooth Operation
The solar panel collects energy throughout the day under direct sunlight and converts it into "free" power to operate the fan -- providing ventilation during daylight hours, when it's needed most.

It creates up to 800 cubic feet of air movement per minute to remove uncomfortable heat in the summer and damaging moisture in the winter. And, the solar panel is wind-, hail- and impact-resistant to stand up to the elements.

Specifications

 

Solar Powered Fan Testimonial—Updated with 2014 Data

In September 2011, the Whisenhunt family in Longmont, CO wrote Air Vent a letter expressing how pleased they were with the performance of their Air Vent roof-mount solar powered fan they installed near the end of the summer 2010. “We have been comparing our electric usage before and after installation,” they wrote. “The results are that the fan has saved enough in electric bills to nearly pay for the cost of the fan.” Prior to installing the fan they used 7 roof louvers for attic exhaust ventilation. The Whisenhunts installed a second roof-mount solar powered fan April 2012. The charts below show the kilowatt usage and the average temperatures before and after the installation of the fans. Pay particular attention to June-August 2010 vs. 2011, 2012, 2013 into 2014. And see the dollar savings. Finally, see the “Notes” section in which the Whisenhunt’s documented the attic temperatures vs. outdoor temperatures. Their readings fall right in line with Air Vent’s recommendations that a balanced attic ventilation system should keep the attic no more than 15-20°F higher than the outdoor temperature.

Note: The Whisenhunt family saved $183.69 in total June-August 2011 vs. the previous year for the same time period. In each of the next two summers they continued to save money compared to 2010 despite higher overall outside temperatures and hikes in electricity costs. The 2012 savings = $157.59. The 2013 savings = $201.11.

2010
Kilowatt Hours
2011
Kilowatt Hours
2012
Kilowatt Hours
2013
Kilowatt Hours
2014
Kilowatt Hours
Notes
Jan. 2668 1751 2013 2487 2211
Feb. 1637 1718 1548 1928 1213
Mar. 1608 1586 1482 1152 2423
Apr. 1659 1586 1214 1649 1588 Installed 2nd fan
on roof April 2012.
May 1603 931 849 1232  
June 1833 1061 1024 933  
July 2626 1585 1795 1419  
Aug. 2601 1662 1518 1194   Installed 1st fan
on roof August 2010.
Sept. 1632 1449 1086 1524
Oct. 1131 1062 960 914
Nov. 1269 1261 1013 922
Dec. 1623 1535 1163 1096

 

2010
Avg. Temperature
2011
Avg. Temperature
2012
Avg. Temperature
2013
Avg. Temperature
2014
Avg. Temperature
Notes
Jan. 31.00 37.00 36.00 28.00 36.00
Feb. 34.00 21.00 34.00 37.00 28.00
Mar. 35.00 39.00 54.00 34.00 40.00
Apr. 45.00 39.00 54.00 42.00 44.00 Installed 2nd fan
on roof April 2012
May 48.00 49.00 56.00 47.00 52.00
June 62.00 60.00 66.00 66.00  
July 71.00 72.00 78.00 74.00  
Aug. 75.00 77.00 78.00 77.00   Installed 1st fan
on roof August 2010.
Sept. 71.00 73.00 73.00 74.00 The attic temperature was no more than 6 degrees warmer than the outdoor temperature after 4 different readings September & October 2012.
Oct. 65.00 61.00 58.00 58.00
Nov. 52.00 45.00 52.00 45.00
Dec. 38.00 36.00 43.00 33.00

 

Specifications | Warranty

 

Automatic Shutter (SHT15W)

 

 

 

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